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Any of you actually trying to learn the Greek language?


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#1 Guest_Dinny_*

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 06:24 PM

I am! But it's a hell of a challenge! Best sites are the Filoglossia and the Greek lesson on Cyprus.org, but since my brain is veeeeeeeery slow I am trying to find casette tapes with Greek lessons. Ever heard of such thing?

Actually, I'm enjoying very much a book I bought in Matala a few weeks ago: "Learn Greek in 25 Years", by Brian Church. It's really funny! But you won't learn much Greek from that either, sigh! Can't say the tittle didn't warn me though!

Any good tips for learning Greek? (besides marrying a Greek, which my daughter did, she actually speaks like a machine gun by now (took her less than 3 years) but I have no idea whether it's Greek she's speaking, people seems to understand her though, but maybe they just got used to her.... )

#2 yannis_s

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 08:58 PM

If you would like to hear the webmaster making strange sounds, like aaaaaaaaaa, oooooooooo, eeeeeeeeee or listen to him counting in Greek, then go to www.explorecrete.com/various/greek-language.htm and look for the flash movies...
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#3 Guest_Anonymous_*

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:22 PM

wow, Yannis, this is great! :-) I had actually already printed the pages on this site, but I hadn't noticed the Flash part with soundtrack! I guess that if I keep it running during all my working hours I will actually be able to count in Greek sounding like you (well, maybe my voice is not QUITE that deep, but you get my point, ehehhe)

Efkarist˛ ;-)

#4 Dinny

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:25 PM

Well, I was trying to reply with my own name/nick - but then I was told that "sorry, this username has already been taken"... well, of course, I TOOK IT, it's actually MY name, ehehhehe

;-)

#5 Guest_Angela_*

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 03:56 AM

I understand your plight. I have been taking Greek classes at University for two years now and I am still nowhere near fluency or even being able to carry on some sort of conversation. Filoglossia is great, glad you found it!

I can't really give any advice on a quick way to learn. Oh, if you learn the alphabet and then try to read Greek (dont know if your that far yet) you have to make sure first you know the sound combinations. Before I took a Greek class I thought I could read (without understanding what I was reading of course) but I was pronoucing almost everything wrong because of that. (ex. N and T = D like Ntalaras, O and I = E). The textbooks I bought for class (and casettes) and good, but they cost almost $200! (at least it lasted for four semesters).

Maybe if you really want to learn Greek and not just words here and there, it would be good to try to learn the contruction and grammar (which is probably the hardest part b/c its a case grammar). Learn how verbs work and then add vocabulary. So that way even if you didn't know what someone was saying, at least you could know well thats a verb and thats the object and so on. Good luck!

I am coming to Greece for 3 weeks mid June and I can't wait to try to use some of what I've learned and hopefully improve my verbal skills! I think in the end just being immersed in the language is really the best way to learn. (start spending a lot of time with your son in law!! hehe)

#6 Dinny

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 08:32 AM

Thanks, Angela. I'll actually have the best teacher when I'll arrive in Matala: My tre-year-old granddaughter! :lol: Only problem is that she speaks Italian as well, and she tends to stick to Italian when with me, but I shall have to get her out of that habit.

#7 Guest_Davey_*

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:19 AM

Hi,

Yup, its pretty hard all right, definitely a case of "its the journey that
counts, not the destination" - it is for me anyway.
Anyway - found this site good for help with pronouncation

http://www.cogsci.in...lan/grkphon.htm

D

#8 Dinny

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:28 AM

Thanks, Davey. Particularly usefull to get to remember the "nasty" letter combinations, which look like one thing but pronounce totally differently!
:roll:

#9 Guest_PG_*

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:32 AM

try the Greek linguaphone

#10 Guest_PG_*

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 11:51 AM

THe Linguaphopne course is the best - there are 90 lessons, but you'll be spaking like a native by the end!! :lol:

#11 _Alberto

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 02:41 PM

The problem is the alphabet. I thought of this but since my intial idea was to go to Rhodes, in Rhodes with a squared area as big as an italina region, they have a resident population of 99,000. Once the touristic season starts you willn find in the season million of tourists. Thus I thought my chances to meet someone who speaks greek would be 1 against 150 or 200. Also on july there is full of italians. Morale, once you know english and your own language (assuming it's not english) you're likely to be able to speak with just whoever!
This of course aside from the fact greek is a fascinating language, that is focusing on the practical side rather than on the cultural one, cause for the latter learning greek is still a good idea and is still self improvement.

#12 Dinny

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 08:08 PM

PG, is the Linguaphone a "casette" course? I am looking for casette lessons since I can combine it with my favourite free-time occupation: walking! :wink:

Alberto, no argueing about that, you will almost for sure be able to find people to talk with everywhere, that understands English that is... but since I plan to move to Crete I really need and want to learn the language. Besides, if you plan to get work in a bar at least you should be able to understand something like "mia bira, parakal˛" :)

#13 daveg

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 09:04 PM

Yes Dinny
If you plan to live here You definately need to learn at least a little. Depending on where you settle It will
1.Just be polite to! or
2.Essential! Just to get by on a day to day basis.
Crete in the summer has a vast population of seasonal workers Not just foreigners many are Greeks from the "Mainland" During the out of season months you will normally be spoken to in Greek/Cretan and a much much smaller percentage will speak any English.
I've been here two years now and my linguitic skills are still pretty poor But I get by.

Though how it must sound to a Greek? as I probably speak Cretan with a Midlands "Black country" accent I don't know :)
Yanni I can't remember if you heard me say any in "Cretan" when we met?
DaveG


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#14 yannis_s

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 10:22 PM

Dave,
I thought we had the whole conversation in Cretan...
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#15 Guest_Angela_*

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 03:53 AM

Not to be off topic, but how different is Cretan as a dialect from mainland or mainstream Greek (which is probably what I'm learning)? Mostly accent (like here in the US), or a lot of vocabulary, etc?

#16 yannis_s

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 07:37 AM

The Cretan dialect differs from "normal" Greek mostly in accent, but there are many different words as well. These words are used mostly by people living in remote areas, especially older people.
Younger people in towns will probably never use these special Cretan words and expressions.
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#17 daveg

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 08:41 AM

One of the big differences I've noticed was the change of the "K" sound to a "Ch" sound
eg. Raki becomes Rachi
Souvlaki becomes Souvlachi etc etc
There is also an old story of an english couple who had to go to hospital in Athens When they spoke to the staff there in Greek [They learned on Crete] They were asked "Why do you speak like peasants" :)

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#18 Guest_PG_*

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 09:34 AM

Hi Dinny
The Linguaphone course consists of 5 cassettes, 90 lessons in total. Another good course is "Teach Yourself Greek" by A. Matsukas - also a cassette course. I'm listening them at the moment on the bus going to work...it's all coming back to me!! :)

#19 Guest_PG_*

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 09:38 AM

Another good cassette course is the "Greek in Three Months" course by Niki Watts - very thorough and very storng on grammar.
I didn't like the "Colloquial Greek" course much though.

#20 Guest_PG_*

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Posted 19 May 2005 - 09:53 AM

This may be of interest:

http://www.hellenicc...n_language.html