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What Makes A Good Language Lesson?


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#1 Emma1310

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:13 AM

I hope this is ok to post as it isn't about Crete but I would very much appreciate your input and ideas.

I know a few of you learn or have learned foreign languages so I'm hoping you can help.

What do you consider to be the ingredients of a good language lesson? What aspects of lessons do you enjoy and which bits of the lesson help you to best learn the language?


Thank you


PS: it's for my TEFL application. I have ideas but think it would be interesting to hear from adults who are learning a language.
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#2 Dinny

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 11:46 AM

I think the best way to learn a language is the "full immersion" way - where you only speak and hear the language you are trying to learn. Total absense of any other language, no translations or explanations in another language whatsoever.

#3 Emma1310

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Posted 21 November 2007 - 04:25 PM

Oh, immersion is a given but you need some building stones with which to build your language skills.

:D
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#4 Wim

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 03:22 PM

M,

I can imagine the problem(s) you could encounter as an "TEFL" since English is not the mother tongue of the students you are teaching.

But there is a solution, I think-hope. The English vocabulary has a great lot of words that find their origin in the Greek language. If I were you I'd start with these words that'll ring a bell to all of you and which will create a band which is the best start I can think of.

Take e.g. this word; "emphasis" in Greek it is "". In case you can't read it it says; = epsilon / = Mu / / = phi / = alpha / = sigma / = eta (ie sound).

Good luck!

B)
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#5 Emma1310

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 04:40 PM

That's a really good idea Wim.

I do know my greek alphabet and a few words luckily.

I still have to finish the test and have an interview but fingers crossed it all works out ok.
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#6 Hooly

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 07:50 PM

Emma

Bit late, but I've been off line, & possibly not much uses on a TEFL course but undoubtedly my Y1 greek class found the learning of the alphabet the most useful part of our course.

It helped expand on the simple phrases we'd been taught and, as Wim suggested, pick up words we'd not been taught but were similar to the English derivative. Thus expanding our vocabulary for not much additional effort. We all felt much more positive as we were able to link simple building blocks of the basic language.

Also learning one regular & a couple of irregular verbs helped us no end. Whether this applies to teaching English I don't know as it's difficult to envisage learning a language I've still not mastered after 48 years! B)

Hope it ends up ok.
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