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#1 Guest_tam_*

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 04:25 PM

just wondered how easy it is to learn greek has any1 done it how long does it take to master?

#2 Angela

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:30 PM

I'd like to know the answer to that question too. I've been studying Greek for about two years now, and I'm nowhere near fluent. I definatley have a good grasp of grammar but am lacking in vocabulary. I think I need to go to Greece for a few months straight in order to be immersed in the language, thats probably the only way I'll really improve. There just isn't really anyone to talk to here, so I don't get much practice, and other studies have taken priority over Greek this year unfortunatly. But, if anyone has become fluent from nothing, especially without being in Greece, how'd it go? and How did you go about it?

#3 Brook

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:48 PM

Being Italian and married to a Greek has helped me learn the language. We speak English at home but when we go to each others family there is plenty of Greek and Italian to go around. I picked up a lot of words and phrases just by being surrounded by the language and having gone to Crete 3 times. I have officially started Greek language courses and am finding it pretty easy as we are starting with the basics. I believe my success with understanding and being able to pick up the language comes from listening to the spoken language either through radio, TV, music or through people's conversations. I think it would be difficult to master a language if you don't hear it or practice it regularly. Best of luck.

#4 Guest_Steve.B_*

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 09:18 PM

Tam,making a start is easy,becoming fluent isnt!
I did a greek class for almost a year,and though I got the basics,and how to ask for things?places/prices etc.,Im far from fluent.
A trap that lots of people fall into in England,is concentrating too much on "Taverna -talk" or ordering in Greek.
Fact is,that is when you need Greek very little,as most waiters are fluent English speakers anyway!
Books and tapes are of some help,but really,you need the one to one of a Greek speaker.The problem with books/tapes/c.d.s etc.is they give you something to say,then a likely reply you may recieve.Trouble is,if you get a different response,your stuffed!
Personally,I feel the only way to be come fluent,is to be exposed to using the language every day,and learning from your mistakes.I find I remember much more when I am in Crete,than when Im at home.

#5 Wim

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 11:21 AM

In a sort of way this is also about learning Greek or at least makes a lot of words more understandable/comprehensible. There is also a way to make a mnemonic. Like e.g. a hand is hairy and in Greek a hand is called "χέρι" etc. The χ being pronounced as "ch" a soft gh sound a sort of guttural but than in the beginning instead of deep in the throat.

Anyhow, I think this is quite interesting to read. I've called it the big Greek speech....

October 1959

During the 12 annual meeting of World Bank, New York, Xenophon Zolotas, who was the Head of the Bank of Greece, started his speech in English but he continued, using words in English with a greek root, except some articles and prepositions. His speech was the following:
“I always wished to address this Assembly in Greek, but realized that it would have been indeed "Greek" to all present in this room. I found out, however, that I could make my address in Greek which would still be English to everybody. With your permission, Mr. Chairman, l shall do it now, using with the exception of articles and prepositions, only Greek words.
Kyrie, I eulogize the archons of the Panethnic Numismatic Thesaurus and the Ecumenical Trapeza for the orthodoxy of their axioms, methods and policies, although there is an episode of cacophony of the Trapeza with Hellas. With enthusiasm we dialogue and synagonize at the synods of our didymous organizations in which polymorphous economic ideas and dogmas are analyzed and synthesized. Our critical problems such as the numismatic plethora generate some agony and melancholy. This phenomenon is characteristic of our epoch. But, to my thesis, we have the dynamism to program therapeutic practices as a prophylaxis from chaos and catastrophe. In parallel, a Panethnic unhypocritical economic synergy and harmonization in a democratic climate is basic. I apologize for my eccentric monologue. I emphasize my euharistia to you, Kyrie to the eugenic and generous American Ethnos and to the organizes and protagonists of his Amphictyony and the gastronomic symposia.”

Two years later, he repeated his effort, with a longer speech, but using more English words.

October 1959

Kyrie, it is Zeus' anathema on our epoch for the dynamism of our economies and the heresy of our economic methods and policies that we should agonize between the Scylla of numismatic plethora and the Charybdis of economic anaemia.
It is not my idiosyncrasy to be ironic or sarcastic, but my diagnosis would be that politicians are rather cryptoplethorists. Although they emphatically stigmatize numismatic plethora, they energize it through their tactics and practices.
Our policies have to be based more on economic and less on political criteria. Our gnomon has to be a metron between political, strategic and philanthropic scopes. Political magic has always been anti-economic.
In an epoch characterized by monopolies, oligopolies, monopsonies, monopolistic antagonism and polymorphous inelasticities, our policies have to be more orthological. But this should not be metamorphosed into plethorophobia, which is endemic among academic economists. Numismatic symmetry should not hyper-antagonize economic acme.
A greater harmonization between the practices of the economic and numismatic archons is basic. Parallel to this, we have to synchronize and harmonize more and more our economic and numismatic policies panethnically.
These scopes are more practicable now, when the prognostics of the political and economic barometer are halcyonic. The history of our didymοus organizations in this sphere has been didactic and their gnostic practices will always be a tonic to the polyonymous and idiomorphous ethnical economies.
The genesis of the programmed organization will dynamize these policies. Therefore, I sympathize, although not without criticism on one or two themes, with the apostles and the hierarchy of our organs in their zeal to program orthodox economic and numismatic policies, although I have some logomachy with them.
I apologize for having tyrannized you with my Hellenic phraseology.
In my epilogue, I emphasize my eulogy to the philoxenous autochtons of this cosmopolitan metropolis and my encomium to you, Kyrie, and the stenographers.

It was send to me by a Greek friend who lives in Athens and with whom I do some Greek learning by means of Skype. She says the word and types it in Greek so I can see how it is written in Greek. In return I do the same with the word in Dutch which makes us both learning.


:angry:
True is that adage: "He who yields to rule by wooden heads, becomes himself a fool."

#6 Wim

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 01:16 PM

Also quite useful is this name translator:Your name in Greek
And when you are lost in translation while using your keyboard this one comes in handy too: Its all Greek to me



Ουϊμ

:angry:
True is that adage: "He who yields to rule by wooden heads, becomes himself a fool."

#7 yannis_s

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 08:19 AM

Wim,
the speeches of Xenophon Zolotas have been on www.explorecrete.com for more than 3 years now.
Yannis Samatas
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#8 Wim

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Posted 24 April 2009 - 12:59 AM

:angry:

:)
True is that adage: "He who yields to rule by wooden heads, becomes himself a fool."